HOUSE OF THE NOBLEMAN
INFO@HOUSEOFTHENOBLEMAN.COM
2014
WOLFE VON LENKIEWICZ
ALGEBRA: THE REUNION OF BROKEN PARTS

15TH – 25TH OCTOBER 2014
9 Grosvenor Place, London

2014
LIGHT FANTASTIC
14TH – 18TH OCTOBER 2014
12 Hay Hill, London

2014
LOGICAL GUESSES
525 West 25th Street, NY
13TH MARCH – 26TH APRIL 2014

2014
BREATHLESS
526 West 26th Street, NY
27TH FEB – 11TH APRIL 2014

2013
RENEWAL OF THE SACRED
The Collection, London
18TH OCT – 18TH NOV 2013

2013
PAPER VERNACULAR: DRAWINGS AND CONSTRUCTIONS. HOUSE OF THE NOBLEMAN, NEW YORK
Cutlog, 107 Suffolk Street, New York
8TH - 13TH MAY 2013

2013
THE OAKES TWINS
LINE OF SIGHT. HOUSE OF THE NOBLEMAN, NEW YORK

46 Mercer Street, PH
6TH – 10TH MARCH 2013

2012
NEW REVISIONS,
ART IN RESIDENCE

NEO BANKSIDE, LONDON
10TH OCT – 10TH NOV 2012

2011
THE RETURN
BOSWALL HOUSE, LONDON
14TH - 23RD OCT 2011

2010
THE HOUSE OF THE NOBLEMAN
BOSWALL HOUSE, LONDON
13TH - 20TH OCT 2010


ALGEBRA
9 Grosvenor Place, London
WOLFE VON LENKIEWICZ
15TH – 25TH OCTOBER 2014
UPCOMING PROJECT
PLEASE BOOK AN APPOINTMENT
Algebra: The Reunion of Broken Parts is a solo exhibition of the work of contemporary British artist Wolfe von Lenkiewicz. The art of Wolfe von Lenkiewicz may be understood as a solemn exercise in algebra. Writing in the 11th century, the Islamic polymath Omar Khayyam described the process of algebra as ‘the reunion of broken parts’, and it is this conception of mathematics that most closely reflects the artist’s painting practice.

An algebraic equation makes use of the abstractions of ‘x’ and ‘y’ to signify the variables of a formula. In the practice of Wolfe von Lenkiewicz the icons of Art History replace the formula, and his works seek out the visual or latent motifs that might take the place of ‘x’ and ‘y’.

The age of the Renaissance has been chosen as a platform for experimentation because it too was attempting to ground the making of art in a mathematical a and aesthetically programmable formula. Lenkiewicz has rendered his works with a careful craftsmanship that seeks to replicate the original conditions and painting practices of artists in the Renaissance. With this in mind, the works that result are, in a sense, works that could have been made in the 16th century, formulas that are made up of the same factors.